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-- mattresses, cooking stove, clothing. the 17-member family is from the region around the city a lot of -- teh city a -- the city aleppo. the farmer and his children fled three weeks ago from the advancing syrian army. none of them wants to give their names. >> look at this -- we had just got everything set up. but then the floods came and destroyed everything. we lost it all. we were promised a stove and a tent, but so far, no aid has come. >> initially, the united nations was providing aid to the unofficial camp, but no supplies have arrived for two weeks. more than 150 syrians are forced to live here. they need everything -- clothes and shoes for the children, food, mattresses, blankets. most of them had to buy their tents themselves, and even have to pay rent to pitch the tents. apart from one tank of drinking water, there is no sanitation. >> we eat bread and drink tea. sometimes, we buy flour and egg bread. we do not have anything anymore. sometimes we go hungry. sometimes not. we lost my daughter's pants in the flood. she needs new pants, but where am i supposed to get them? >> sometime
are demanding his overthrow after the demonstrations in several cities in recent days turn violent and dozens were killed. >> earlier in the day, there were scuffles in the center of tahrir square, the focal point of the revolution that overthrew president hosni mubarak two years ago. protests marking the second anniversary of the uprising that toppled mubarak have killed nearly 60 people since january 25, prompting the head of the army to warned this week that the state was on the verge of collapse. our correspondent is in cairo for us. we are hearing about water cannon shots being fired. how serious is the tension there at the moment? >> it basically escalated in the last hours. we have peaceful demonstrations at tahrri square and at the presidential palace, but demonstrators tried to break through the barriers at the international palace. police acted with tear gas, then the demonstrators threw molotov cocktails. we have the same blame game going on. the presidency says that the parties who organized the protest are responsible for today's violence while one of the opposition leaders said
of tunis, shops and businesses were boarded up. the general strike has brought the city to a standstill. >> for more on this, we are joined now live by our correspondent who is standing by in tunis. the clashes we have been seeing look especially fierce. what is the situation right now? >> clashes erupted earlier this afternoon. the situation is anxious. the situation is still unclear. it is not clear how it will evolve on the political end either. at the moment, tunisia is really not knowing what will happen in the next few days. >> what do you think? how is the crisis likely to play out given the tensions between ultra-conservative moslem groups on the one hand and secularists on the other in tunisia? >> it seems it might actually lead to not a second revolution, but it might lead to a reconstruction of the political landscape in tunisia, especially as democratic forces have been divided for the last couple of years are finally working together. there's a chance that the democratic process might find a good way to come together. >> thanks so very much. as tunisian deals with the fallo
the country. supporters flooded the streets of tunis and other cities. there are reports of barricades being erected in clashes with police. >> news of the assassination sparked protests in several tunisian cities. in the capital, thousands of angry protesters followed the ambulance carrying belaid's body. many blame the islamists, an accusation the party denies. >> people know that the criminals are directly linked to the head of the party. >> all these islamist organizations of terrorist grou. history is a witness. it is not possible to discuss, negotiate, or agree with terrorists. the government has no other choice but to resign. otherwise, the tunisian people will topple them. they must step down. >> belaid was gunned down outside his home on wednesday. he headed the secular left- leaning patriots party. his allies said the killing was calculated to cause civil unrest. >> these people want to turn tunisian into another somalia. they want to see a spiral of violence in our country. we will not fall for that. chokri will not be the last march. >> in a speech to the european parliament, cal
their remaining strongholds. they have already taken back the major cities in the north. for the people of timbuktu, the french are viewed as heroes. >> today, i can do my job as i want to. if i have a customer, i can touch his beard, to a modern hair cut, i can do as i like. the i am free, and i can also earn more. and i started listening to music again. >> tuesday's meeting marks a first step toward outlining a future course for mali, but delegates realize they face a huge challenge. >> mali has called on the international community to support its efforts. is there a sense everyone is on the same page and pulling together? we put that question to our brussels correspondent. >> there's a very big sense of unity here in brussels where delegates mets from around the world to discuss the malian situation, and the general message from all the various representatives was that a combination of military and political efforts is needed to restore stability in mali. on the military level, the goal is to get african soldiers to take over from the french troops. that has to be accompanied by some
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5